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Master class for translators

Master class for translators

The problem with many novice translators is that they replace words or constructions of someone else's speech with literal equivalents that are characteristic of their native language. While something completely different is required: to convey the meaning!

We'll take a look at the beginning of an article by contributing journalist Edward Sullivan from the daily thisislondon.com and use illustrative examples to show how, why and why what we call the art of translation is applied.

General principles

First, we read the entire article in English, restraining impatience and not trying to translate anything, but taking notes for ourselves in difficult places. We read it together:

Great to drink at the Gate, yeah

Before getting started - one general note. Disheartening, perhaps, but categorical. If the translator does not understand more than 20% of the text, it is not a translator, but also a student. Such a person cannot be engaged in translations! First, you need to master the language enough to understand 80% of the translated text without looking into dictionaries. And only then you can start translating like a job. 

Title - half of the text

Only after reading the article and in general understanding its meaning, you can try to go back and translate the title:

"Great to drink at the Gate, yeah".

Analysis of the text shows that Gate means the name of a pub (pub) - an English beer bar.

"The translation of foreign names may not be done," whispers the dubious wisdom of the lazy translators, "such names can be translated into translation as they are - with islands of the Latin alphabet in the sea of the Cyrillic alphabet." It would seem that it is guaranteed that nothing will be distorted, and such a text looks - at first glance - very clever.Но вкрапления иностранных слов в плавное течение русского текста неминуемо будут раздражать своей инородностью. Поэтому этот вариант – худший из возможных.

The second natural impulse is to translate literally: Gate.

Pay attention to the fact that in English there are "gates" in the unit. number (gate) and "gate" in pl. number (gates), while in the Russian "gate" in sing. h. is a drilling mechanism or collar. This is the first difficulty.

The second difficulty is that if you translate Gate as "gate", then all the Englishness of the name disappears, which cannot be allowed - we are talking about Great Britain, London.

The third option: transliterate (transliterate English pronunciation in Russian letters): Gate turns into Gate. This option is the most preferable one.

In addition, just such a translation can "kill two birds with one stone": first - specific English realities are not distorted, second - there is no foreign (English) interspersing in the Russian text (therefore, eyes are not overstrained, attention is not distracted ... national identity does not suffer. do not agree with us, read "Kommersant", "Computerra" ... the manual for "Microsoft Office").

But this technique is not always valid. Remember: New York, but Notre Dame Cathedral; The White House, but the Pentagon. Therefore, when translating names, you should think about which of the three possible methods is most preferable. One should be guided by one's own taste and objective traditions. The result should not hurt the eye, should not look flashy and alien in the Russian text.

This is the time to unleash healthy skepticism. And why did we, in fact, decide that Gate is the name of a pub?

In this case, Gate may well be the name of another reality unknown to us, or, say, generally a synonym for the word pub. It's like writing down a remark in Russian: "I'll go and have a drink at the Eatery!"

It should be remembered that the English, as a rule, do not use quotation marks on names. They capitalize them. Especially in the headlines. (In Russian microtypography, there is also such a rule for quotation marks in headings, but only a few know it, and only a fraction of a tenth do it ... - Note. Ed.) Guess what you can translate. After all, an English author could well, for purposes unknown to us, emphasizing an unknown meaning to us, write a common noun with a capital letter. Once again, the translator must discover the purpose and meaning and convey it to the reader.

You should not trust your own instinct when translating. The article should be read and re-read. In this case, the meaning of the word Gate becomes clear no earlier than the article will be read to the end. Moreover, you should return to the title when the text itself has been fully translated by you. At the same time, in the process of translation, one must remember the need for a constant, at least mental return to the very beginning of the translated text.

Let's move on to the next word, which at first glance seems as simple as the newspaper "Gudok": drink - to drink. If you literally follow the text, the literal translation will be something like this: "It's great to have a drink at the Gate, yes!" or "Worthy of a drink at the Gate, yes!" Sounds idiotic, doesn't it?

Something more Russified asks to come to mind: "Nice to have a glass (mug, mug) in the Gate pub!" True, there are no specific words "mug" or "glass" in the English text. Nor does it contain the word "skip", which is understandable to every Russian. But "to drink" would have sounded too weighty for the Russian language. Our task is to convey meaning, not words. The meaning is contained in the whole phrase, and not in its individual parts. Any part of the text should be perceived "in the light" of the entire article as a whole.

So: great - it would be logical to convey the meaning of the word with a superlative lexeme or a Russian equivalent expressing approval; drink - the meaning can be conveyed by a Russian phrase understandable to everyone, at the Gate - presumably in a pub with that name. Yeah, you guessed it, means an exclamation accompanying a feeling of delight, victory, anticipation, etc. Variants are already possible here! Whoever likes it - so he translates!

There is no obscenity in our translation. If you start varying, gradually moving away from the English phrase, you can, of course, come up with something like: "Stopudovo to take a couple of cans on your chest in a pub!"

It is possible, boredom the reader, and give out the following: "It's good to drink beer in G. Yes."

In either case, the author's idea will reach the reader. The only question is how accurate.

As a result, the simple title of the article sounds something like this: "Nice to skip a mug at the Gate pub - yes!" 

Working with the first phrases

We read the text for the second time and this time we begin to translate it.

As we have already noted, the article is written in a light, airy style. But we will not discuss the style further, but we will look at common mistakes and sort out difficult places.

The beginning is the most important thing, the right tone taken from the very beginning is half the work. That is why most of all attention is paid to the first, opening words. The first paragraph is one of the most important. For this is an introduction that brings the author and the reader together!

Being a good Catholic lad, I avert my gaze whenever I see a silk chemise sliding down the svelte body of a dusky young maiden; choose to ignore the occasional stray, glistening hair which she wouldn't normally want to be seen as public property; and would never comment on her physiological response to fluctuating ambient temperatures. The rest of the world, however, is not so pure of mind.

First of all, we highlighted what seemed incomprehensible to us during a fluent reading. We also highlighted some familiar, but dubious words that made reading difficult. We advise you to do the same.

Accordingly, first of all we analyze the unknown words. At the same time, it is dangerous to rely on your own ingenuity, drawing conclusions from the logic of the text. Conjectures instead of exact knowledge will sooner or later lead to diametrical distortions of meaning!

Of the 68 words in this paragraph, we do not know the exact meaning of only four words. As you can see, the proportion of 20 and 80%, which we mentioned above as a prerequisite, has been met. This is a good starting point for translation work. Moreover, upon close examination, these words turn out to be additional descriptions of basic concepts. You can go on.

Almost the entire paragraph fit into one - albeit extremely difficult grammatically - sentence. First, let's see if we can break it down into several significant parts. Something like this (although everyone can do it as they like):Being a good Catholic lad

I avert my gaze whenever I see a silk chemise sliding down the svelte body of a dusky young maiden;

choose to ignore the occasional stray, glistening hair which she wouldn't normally want to be seen as public property;

and would never comment on her physiological response to fluctuating ambient temperatures.

The rest of the world, however, is not so pure of mind.

In this case, we see that the second piece of text is the most difficult to understand. It contains three words unfamiliar to us, and it is also the longest.

We look for these words in a dictionary or in dictionaries.

At the word "dictionaries", surely someone habitually reached for Müller or NBARS. Stop! Taking the meanings of English words from the english-russian dictionary is fundamentally wrong!

This is the main law. This is the only way to recognize the inner meaning of the word, the image behind it, which the British themselves perceive, and not a ready-made, standard-limited version of the translation into Russian.

For example, the word dusky, which in the English-Russian dictionary is translated as "dark, twilight, darkish", etc., does not give the main meaning of this word, which is instantly associated with the color of the skin in English: dark skin, i.e. "dark".

So:

  • chemise – women's shirt, shirt dress, "shemizetka". Such technical terminology as "road surface", of course, will not work. Although who knows, because sometimes it is so difficult to predict what the comrade author means!
  • svelte – slender, flexible (about a woman); polished, laid-back, secular, courteous (about the style of behavior); smooth, streamlined (about the shape);
  •  dusky – twilight, dark, dusky; unclear, vaguely distinguishable; gloomy, sad;
  • ambient – external (about what is around); surrounding, washing.

If you know fewer meanings of words than we do, that's okay. Refer to dictionaries. Dictionaries are a translator's best friend. Read them carefully And remember that the possibility of misunderstanding and misinterpretation increases exponentially when unknown words and expressions appear in the text. This is because each of them has several meanings - especially in English, one of the most polysemantic - and these meanings are sometimes very far from each other.

We proceed to a thorough study of this paragraph. Are all forms clear, are all times known, do you mentally stumble over some words, phrases? If everything is clear, then you can try to convey what you read in Russian. Let's try.

Being a good Catholic lad... – Being a good Catholic ... How do you like it?

A dull word-for-word translation from English into Russian.

Is the meaning conveyed? Transferred. No gags? No.

But still, something is not right. And this "not that" falls into several parts:

Do you often meet in Russian, especially in Russian periodicals, the construction "Being ..."? We are sure not often. Therefore, it must be treated with caution (i.e. it must be borne in mind, but try to look for other options).

Lad – this is, of course, a guy. But which one? We look in the dictionary. This is more like a "fellow", "young man", "shirt-guy" than just "a male person who has reached maturity, but is not married." We have this in mind as well.

There are problems with Catholicism in the world in general. There are nuances of Catholicism. You need to know them. Catholics are more Puritans than Protestants. They are not allowed to get divorced. They still look askance at naked female legs and shoulders. And in general, to call yourself a Catholic means to impose certain life restrictions on yourself. Without a clear understanding of this, it is impossible to start translating a text that includes the word "Catholic". It is this word that is the key to the author's further mockery. And if a "Catholic" is also "good" ("holier than the Pope", as the famous saying goes), then you can fully feel the depth of the author's sarcasm.

Thus, the entire paragraph is built on the antithesis: I am so squeezed by religious restrictions, and here is a riot of flesh. It would seem that there is no need for a translator to think so deeply about a simple text; however, without serious analysis, it is impossible to reproduce the style.

Accurate translation begins as if it were the other way around: first we try to understand not so much the meaning as the style of the foreign language author. Then we translate the content into "Russian pictures". And while working, we constantly make corrections for the author's style as a very important component of the text.

Try again:

Being a good Catholic lad... – I am like a strict Catholic upbringing...

This is closer in style, but in meaning we have gone aside. Having omitted the "small, broken, shirt-guy", omitting "being, being, being", omitting "Catholic", we replaced everything with a certain phrase, in which only the feeling of the author's style remains - the feeling of scoffing ...

English prose in general and journalism in particular imply the use of complex constructions with the "stringing" of numerous synonyms and with the use of "fanciful" synonyms instead of well-known words. It is considered to be a means of creating a beautiful style.

But in Russian, the same effect is achieved by other means.

Therefore, as an approach, one can propose "the creation of a figurative picture based on the original text" and its transmission by means familiar to the Russian language. Example: "silk chemise sliding down the svelte body of a dusky young maiden". The author wants to conjure up a sexy beauty who, by an accidental movement, exposed her seductive forms (svelte body - seductive forms, dusky maiden - dark-skinned beauty). Thus, we fix this image in our head, and then we do it so that the picture we need appears in front of the reader's eyes. It doesn't matter which words we use. We can "forget" everything - sliding down, svelte, and silk chemise - in the created image there is no emphasis on such details as "silk", just in English this word is sonorous, beautiful and fits well in size.

Another important point is the observance of rhythm and size. These positions are an integral part of "prettiness". Russian text should be read as easily as English is read - without losing the tempo. For the sake of preserving this, you can and should sacrifice details. The main thing is that the "picture" is accurately transmitted. For example, dusky young maiden. Here we may well sacrifice the word "young". In English, it fits in size and adds imagery. But it is not a carrier of key information. The key information here is "the Catholic does not stare at the weaker sex." The rest is an appendage. As a result, omitting the word "young", we do not lose anything, because by means of the Russian language we will convey imagery so much that the reader will not even have a shadow of doubt that the Catholic is looking at the young beauty, and not at the matron of pre-retirement age. In the reader's imagination, the image of the "young" will certainly be present. In the text of the translation - no. If you write "a slender waist of a swarthy beauty", then what arises in the mind of a Russian reader? Certainly not an eighty-year-old woman.

Fluctuating, ambient – from the same series of optional, non-keywords. These words should be present in the "mental picture", but not in the translation. Ambient is simply one of the sonorous variations of the neutral expression "ambient" designed to add imagery to the text. Compare "her physiological response to fluctuating ambient temperatures" and "how she sweats when it's getting hotter in the room". (By the way, the author has achieved an excellent result, "combing" his internal thesaurus. Aerobatics for an English journalist. A Russian translator is obliged to repeat this aerobatics, having completely different aircraft at his disposal.)

This will become clear from further work with the text.

...I avert my gaze whenever I see a silk chemise sliding down the svelte body of a dusky young maiden...

... I always look away from silk blouses, which strive to reveal the sleek forms of young waitresses ...

We continue the translation, not forgetting that verbs in 1 person singular. h. still refer to the author leading the story in the first person: choose to ignore the occasional stray, glistening hair which she wouldn't normally want to be seen as public property, - because I avert, I choose, etc. etc.

Stray, glistening is about the waitress's hair: shiny, because she runs around like a madman among the tables all day and serves beer-pumped customers, secretly suffering from how bad she looks, and fearing that her involuntary slovenliness will become the subject of ridicule (or even reflections) men - and who else is sitting in bars?

...and would never comment on her physiological response to fluctuating ambient temperatures...

And now we are trying to translate the entire phrase as a whole..

Being a good Catholic lad, I avert my gaze whenever I see a silk chemise sliding down the svelte body of a dusky young maiden; choose to ignore the occasional stray, glistening hair which she wouldn't normally want to be seen as public property; and would never comment on her physiological response to fluctuating ambient temperatures. The rest of the world, however, is not so pure of mind.

As a respectable Catholic, I always avert my eyes at the sight of the charms of a dark-skinned beauty, naked by a blouse accidentally falling from her shoulder, I leave unnoticed by chance the shiny hairs of her intimate places presented to the public, and I never allow myself to be greasy about her natural reaction to the stuffiness in the room. Alas, there are very few guardians of morality like me.

If you re-read the original now, it will most likely turn out that not everything has been translated by us in the way that you already see it after our detailed analysis.

Well - try it differently!

And we are going further. 

"Untranslatable word-pay"? !!!

And so it was revealed when a few weeks ago I bumped into two readers, Tim German and Andrew Dyer, who are both recent graduates in testosterone studies from the University Of Hull. 'Why don't you do a piece one week on pulling joints?' asked Tim. Pulling? 'Yeah, you know, places to score. Scoring as in... Yes, I know what scoring is, I wasn't brought up by John bleedin' Motson, you know.

In principle, all the words themselves are clear to us, but as for their connection - there is something to think about. If you don't even know the basic meanings, look in the dictionary. But what we don't know is the mysterious John bleedin 'Motson.

The passage about the University of Hull is also a little unclear. There is a slight (intentional or not?) Irony in the mention of the study of testosterone (this is nothing more than a male sex hormone). Whether this irony has anything to do with the university itself, which in reality may turn out to be some kind of women's college, or which has never had any courses in the study of male hormones, is not yet clear.

There are also doubts about pulling joints. Either it is "crossroads", or "shoals with marijuana", or something else.

We begin to reason.

The phrase so it was revealed is dual. On the one hand, the verb "opens" - not only the subsequent information, but also the previous paragraph. On the other hand, he also "exposes". Let's remember this.

Bump into - this expression generally refers to cars, when they spoil each other's bumpers (that's where bump came from!) In a collision. With regard to people, we can say this: an unplanned meeting on the street, nose to nose.

Recent graduates - not hard: "recent graduates". Another thing is difficult: how to find out where the "University of Hull" is located and whether it is an ordinary institution? After all, if our guesses are correct and the author sneers at the obvious information about the university, then we run the risk of missing (and not reflecting in translation) an excellent poignancy.

In such cases (as we have already indicated above), the translators are faced with a dilemma. Recognizing - not recognizing? Rely on intuition or find out all the details?

Of course, it's always best to find out. The more meticulously you extract details about any subject, the more completely you will master the material and the easier it will be for you to translate.

When searching for information, the Internet is an indispensable tool. No one has and cannot have at hand the knowledge collected in all kinds of reference books, dictionaries and encyclopedias, in its entirety. Meanwhile, a considerable part of this wealth has already been transferred to the Internet and is constantly being supplemented and updated in it.

An auxiliary search for information for translation is very simple: the title, name, subject, about which you want to know more, are transferred to the search line of any search engine (for Russian texts - Yandex, Aport or Rambler, for English texts - Yahoo or Altavista). Skim the first pages of the returned results - as with any search on the global web. In 90% of cases, this method works productively. Examples illustrating the indispensability of the Internet are scattered in abundance below. You will not find such information anywhere else, spending a minimum of time and effort.

So, Hull University: http://eyorks.com/hullpub/,

and also http://www.hull.ac.uk/home/hull.html. We look and immediately come across the following facts: firstly, the university is not located in London, but in York (i.e. the author communicated with the provincials), and secondly, the students at this university are fun, because one of the basic pages of the university The site is dedicated to crawl, which in English students' slang means "wandering around pubs, purposefully bypassing them." Do not believe it, see for yourself: the diagrams of passages to pubs, news about pubs, streets where there are pubs, and so on and so forth ... That is, gentlemen from York, who have thoroughly studied testosterone at the University of Hull, firsthand imagine what a "detour pubs "and, most importantly, what to expect from an article on this global topic.

The author also points out that they are "readers", that is, he might not know them, but they probably know him, since they caught him on the street and told him about an idea that was implemented at their university a long time ago and is popular.

Pulling joints is a phrase from the category of those that have not yet entered the dictionaries (we honestly searched and did not meet). The polysemantic word pull basically means "connection", "pulling something with something or to something". Joint is just a "bunch", "weave", "intersection" (also with many meanings). Thus, we can conclude that we are talking about a "hot spot", about "a point where people are attracted, pulled". Realizing that we are talking about pubs, we conclude that pulling joints are the slang expression for pubs.

John bleedin 'Motson - again we plunge into the Internet, because according to dictionaries it will not be possible to find either just John that is suitable in meaning, or bleeding Motson. And what? We were immediately lucky. It turns out that John Motson is one of the most famous English football commentators, nicknamed "Motty". He became glorious back in the memorable 70s, when not a single more or less important championship could do without his participation, and he is glorious precisely for the passion of his comments. Here's a quote from one soccer site:

"One of the sport's true enthusiasts, Motty has a vast knowledge of the game and is rated by many as the best in the business at the tough task of player identification".

Hence the bleedin '- after all, when your favorite team loses, the soul "bleeds".

Now the phrase about scoring becomes clear: who, if not a football commentator, is the best versed in goals, points and standings (ranking according to the degree of best-average-worst) ...

But let's not get ahead of ourselves. We were able to extract as much background information from this paragraph as possible. Some conclusions can be drawn. If something else is not clear to you, then try the same methods to find the information yourself. 

Digression on derogations

In relation to the above, there are some more reflections.

Realities that need to be explained verbatim in the course of the text should be neglected and ruthlessly thrown out. Alas, alas, for the sake of maintaining the pace and style. Especially if they do not carry a semantic load and are designed for emotional perception. Think for yourself, does the reader need to delve into what Hull University is famous for? Maybe he is known for freedom of morals, maybe for something else. In our case, these details clutter up the picture and slow down the pace, and truncation does not affect the mental picture in any way.

The same goes for John Motson. An unknown surname distracts the attention of the Russian reader. Your explanations make him digest a bunch of unnecessary information, while the "mental picture" melts away. If it were Yuri Nikulin or Vladimir Zhirinovsky, the line "would go like clockwork", but John Motson ... will not fit in any way. In addition, in the text it is tied to the word scoring - a football term that we are going to beat as "eat."

And the last thing. In the Russian text, it is necessary to smoothly reconstruct the shaded logic of the original. Is always. This creates the necessary coherence of perception. In our case, this is the line "Why don't you do a piece one week on pulling joints?" The "mental picture" of this piece is this: "You keep writing and writing about trendy pubs, fashionable restaurants, and you have never written about hot spots." Those. the conversation about writing an article about pulling joints did not come off the bat. The question was addressed to a man who is a restaurant reviewer, and was intended to draw his attention to the other side of the restaurant life: "Here, they say, what you lack to complete the picture." And this layer of text must be reflected in the Russian version.

Something like this:

And so it was revealed when a few weeks ago I bumped into two readers, Tim German and Andrew Dyer, who are both recent graduates in testosterone studies from the University Of Hull. 'Why don't you do a piece one week on pulling joints?' asked Tim. Pulling? 'Yeah, you know, places to score. Scoring as in... Yes, I know what scoring is, I wasn't brought up by John bleedin' Motson, you know.

I came to this depressing conclusion a couple of weeks ago when I accidentally ran into two of my readers on the street, Tim Herman and Andrew Dyer. Both of them have recently graduated from university and during their studies have become very skilled in research and practical exercises on male hormones. "Look," Tim told me, "your notes lack an overview of the rental establishments." I gave him a puzzled look. "Well, removable, - he explained. - There are pubs where you can rent ... well, you know who!" Understood, old man, perfectly understood. I am not a small child and I know that you can shoot not only movies.

Idioms and phraseological units

Curiously enough, the following day I received a similar request in a missive from another reader who named himself as Simon Smith – please note, only friends and regular acquaintances enjoy the anonymity of having their surname removed from these pages. That's because they know where I live and might come round and shout at me. 'Are there any pubs we can go to for a bit of sexual activity?' he enquired.

Missive - "message, letter, letter, message". Let us remember, by the way, that the words message, letter, mail, correspondence have an excellent, albeit slightly archaic, synonym. Use it sometimes.

Simon Smith is a character who is not among the friends of the author and does not use anonymity. If you understood this phrase differently, ours is with a brush.

There are no more unfamiliar words for us. And for you?

For us, there are also no alarming realities, subtle nuances of meaning. Therefore, we do not hesitate to risk immediately improvising the translation.

Curiously enough, the following day I received a similar request in a missive from another reader who named himself as Simon Smith – please note, only friends and regular acquaintances enjoy the anonymity of having their surname removed from these pages. That's because they know where I live and might come round and shout at me. 'Are there any pubs we can go to for a bit of sexual activity?' he enquired.

You may not believe me, but the very next day I received a message from another reader, a certain Simon Smith - here it should be said that in my articles I give fictitious names only to close friends and acquaintances. Do you know why? Because they know where I live ... they can come to me and say their "phi". However, I digress. The message asked the question: "Tell me, are there pubs in the city where you can have fun with the opposite sex?"

Further, we will no longer separately stipulate each case when we omit individual English expressions or add something that is not in the foreign text at all. The logic of translation is the logic of revealing the meaning of the text, the coherence of the text, the imagery and the adequacy of the author's style. The rest is from the evil one. Attempts to combine all of the above and literal translation are absurdity, absurdity and insanity.

It materialises he'd misinterpreted one of my reviews in which I described a place 'suitable for clandestine liaisons', went there, tried to have a bit of rumpy pumpy with an actress who'd appeared in an Armitage Shanks training video (the mind boggles), was told off and eventually was asked to leave the premises. Anyway, I'm thinking about your suggestions guys, but I've a lot of research to do first. Meanwhile, I've been separating the wheat from the chaff in Notting Hill Gate and didn't score so much as an own goal. But then again, I wasn't playing football.

The procedure is already familiar to us. We have written out unfamiliar words, those in a comprehensive knowledge of the meanings of which we doubt.

Clandestine liaisons - secret connection. The subtext is the irony that comes from the use of a military term for "private, intimate encounters."

Rumpy pumpy - this word, of course, quite specifically gravitates to the usual "trawl-wali", but we, the translators, will try to search for the source material.

And we find: rump - "animal nipples", "rump of birds" and even "ass" (playfully). Pump has two meanings: "pump" and "ballet slipper, ballet shoe". There are additional meanings: "slow-witted" and even "heart" (in the sense, pumps and pumps blood).

Therefore, rumpy pumpy is still something very close to "trail-wali", but more physiological, or something ...

Armitage Shanks - we do not find the meaning of the first word in dictionaries. This is probably the name. Therefore, we dive into the net again and look for it there.

A kind of "dual alliance" is revealed: a manufacturer and seller of sanitary ware under this brand (http://www.biw.co.uk/BIW/register/1013.htm) and obscenity: http: //www.elis.demon. co.uk/shanks/disc.htm (go and admire at least Gallery Of Toilet-Humor). What was required to be found.

Boggle - "to be afraid", "beware", "shy away", etc. But since this word is usually often found in this way: mind-boggling ("something superboggling"), and mind boggles are played out in the text, we draw a conclusion about the meaning of this word in relation to this text.

Chaff - "chaff", "straw". Let's be careful, because reading the text immediately suggests the conclusion that separate the wheat from the chaff is nothing more than "separating the wheat from the chaff." This is not the case. Because "separating the husk from the chaff" is a standard phrase and it sounds different: to separate the husk from the grain.

Wheat - on closer examination, it is still "wheat", not "grain", and chaff is still "chaff", not "tares". In addition, there is a proverb an old bird is not caught by chaff - "you can't fool an old sparrow on chaff." All this must be remembered when translating and check yourself repeatedly.

Let's pay close attention to the last two sentences: here the playing with the meanings of the word score, which began in the previous paragraph, ends. For simplicity, let's imagine that in Russian, "to score a goal" can mean not only "to hit the goal" but also ... "to shoot a girl." Then it turns out the following: in the second paragraph, Tim says to the author: "There are places where you can" score a goal ", not in the sense of" score into the goal ", but in the sense ..." Author: "Yes, I understand, I understand. What do you think , my horizons are limited to John Motson ?! " The play on words with score gets its logical conclusion. The author, referring to the university graduates, says about their idea: "I tried to conduct reconnaissance in force, but so far I have not scored a single goal, except perhaps in my own goal. True, this matter will be more difficult than playing football" (own goal - own goal). In Russian, however, all this should be removed (alas), since "to score a goal" cannot mean "to shoot a girl." Therefore, when translating, you can, on the one hand, leave the game with the word "shoot" started in the second paragraph, and on the other, use compensation (to maintain the tempo and emotional message), i.e. add the phrase "well, you know who ..." missing in the original. In general, this will help maintain equivalence.

It materialises he'd misinterpreted one of my reviews in which I described a place 'suitable for clandestine liaisons', went there, tried to have a bit of rumpy pumpy with an actress who'd appeared in an Armitage Shanks training video (the mind boggles), was told off and eventually was asked to leave the premises. Anyway, I'm thinking about your suggestions guys, but I've a lot of research to do first. Meanwhile, I've been separating the wheat from the chaff in Notting Hill Gate and didn't score so much as an own goal. But then again, I wasn't playing football.

In general, he misunderstood the point

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